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February 28, 2018

Amazon’s Health Care Plans Are Driven By Its Bottom Line, Not Its People

by Benjamin Y. Fong
Originally published on Huffington Post.

DSA member Benjamin Fong wrote for Huffington Post about the corporate powerhouses Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway exploring a “disruptive” health care strategy for its own US-based employees, which would provide (ostensibly low-quality) care at a low cost, supposedly free of profit motives. Fong isn’t having it.

And indeed, in spite of the seemingly progressive rhetoric (“improving employee satisfaction,” “free from profit-making incentives,” etc.), every commentator on this proposal saw it quite clearly as a business decision. The New York Times even compared it to “classic disruption,” where a company enters “a market with a product that is lower in value than that of market incumbents, but much lower in cost.” That a proposed nonprofit health care company would be immediately and so easily compared to “classic disrupters, like Southwest Airlines, MP3s or Japanese carmakers,” is a good indication that most people doubt that health is really the goal here.

Read the rest at Huffington Post.